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Interviews were conducted in English or in Tagalog or Visayan with the assistance of a translator. Whenever possible, interviews were conducted one-on-one in a private setting.

Researchers also spoke with interviewees in pairs, trios, or small groups when students asked to meet together or when time and space constraints required meeting with members of student organizations simultaneously.

Human Rights Watch conducted the research for this report between September 2016 and February 2017 in 10 cities on the major islands of Luzon and the Visayas in the Philippines.

To identify interviewees, we conducted outreach through LGBT student groups, particularly at the university level.

It examines three broad areas in which LGBT students encounter problems—bullying and harassment, discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity, and a lack of information and resources—and recommends steps that lawmakers, Dep Ed, and school administrators should take to uphold LGBT students’ right to a safe and affirming educational environment.

In the absence of effective implementation and monitoring, many LGBT youth continue to experience bullying and harassment in school.

Despite prohibitions on bullying, for example, students across the Philippines described patterns of bullying and mistreatment that went unchecked by school staff.

Carlos M., a 19-year-old gay student from Olongapo City, said: “When I was in high school, they’d push me, punch me.

But in the Philippines, students who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) too often find that their schooling experience is marred by bullying, discrimination, lack of access to LGBT-related information, and in some cases, physical or sexual assault.

These abuses can cause deep and lasting harm and curtail students’ right to education, protected under Philippine and international law.

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